Category: covenant

3 Nephi 21: 25

3 Nephi 21: 25:

“And then shall the power of heaven come down among them; and I also will be in the midst.”

What does the “power of heaven” include? (We’ve already looked at 1 Nephi 14: 14 which is speaking about this same event, you should read again that post.)

What is the difference between the “power of heaven” and the Lord’s presence?

Why would the power of heaven come first, then the Lord?  (Moses 1: 11.)

What would it require for you to be able to endure the presence of the Lord? (Moses 1: 2.)

If you are not prepared for His presence, what will your reaction be?  (Mormon 9: 3-5.)

Those who are directly in a covenant with Him, who have been promised forgiveness of their sins by Him, and who have sought and obtained His face, will be able to dwell in His presence. They will be prepared for His glory, have part in it, and thereby be protected when they are with Him.

If people have the “power of heaven” with them, do they need some other means to protect them as well? Why not?

Haven’t we already been promised this as early as 1833?  (See D&C 97: 15-19.)  What happened that we did not obtain these things? Have our Temples been kept undefiled?  If not, why? Have we permitted the unclean to enter? If so, why?  Is the glory of the Lord in our Temples? Can we behold His presence there? If not, why not?

If the promise was made to us in 1833 and we haven’t realized it from then till now, then are we to be numbered among those who will have the Lord “in their midst” as set out in this verse?  What should we do to change that?

By and large, the church has failed to honor the Book of Mormon, keep its terms and become heirs of its promises.  Our collective failure does not prevent individual success.  Individuals may still realize the blessings offered. But each of us must meet the exact same conditions. Having met them, however, nothing can prevent you from obtaining the blessings.

The Lord has been willing to bring individuals back into His presence on the same conditions throughout all time. Read again The Second Comforter if you do not remember what those conditions are. He is as willing to make you a citizen of Zion, member of the church of the Firstborn, and part of the general assembly today (D&C 76: 66-69) as in the future established Zion spoken of in the verses we have been reviewing. Many have done it in times past. Some have done it in our day. All are offered the same opportunity, but always on the same conditions.

The unchanging Gospel of Jesus Christ is always the same, and its blessings are always available.

3 Neph 16: 11

“And then will I remember my covenant which I have made unto my people, O house of Israel, and I will bring my gospel unto them.”
When the Gentiles have rejected the fullness of the Gospel, the Lord’s memory will be stirred. He will “remember His covenant” again. 
Notice the covenant He will remember is for “His people,” whose interests and inheritance will now be vindicated.  His words will be fulfilled. The Father’s promises will all be realized. But “His people” are not the Gentiles. His people are the remnant to whom the Gospel will come as a matter of covenant and inheritance to reclaim a fallen people. This is the re-grafting of the natural branches referred to in Jacob 5: 67-75.  It is important to note that the Lord of the vineyard was directly involved with the few servants assigned to accomplish this final work of gathering together.  (Jacob 5: 72.) 
This is to be done after the Gentiles (who are the European Latter-day Saints who descend from the bloodlines that overran and dispossessed the native people in North America), have rejected the fullness of the Gospel. Therefore, you should not expect that the institutional church, controlled as it is by those very same bloodlines, will be the means through which this final effort will be accomplished. 
When the time comes, the Lord will “bring [His] gospel to them.”  How will He do this? What “laborers” should we expect to be sent?  How, if the Gentiles have rejected the fullness of His Gospel, will the Gentiles be involved? 
Can Gentiles who are lifted up in the pride of their hearts above all nations of the earth assist? If not, then what Gentiles can assist? 
Isn’t Ephriam to be involved? After all, they have the birthright. Are they not involved? 
If they are, who will it be from among Ephriam? 
How can the remnant to whom these blessings are promised, have still among them a few descendants of Ephriam?  Why will Mannassah, through the remnant, build the New Jerusalem, yet it will be Ephriam through whom the blessings are conferred upon the returning Lost Tribes?  (D&C 133: 26-34.) 
How can the New Jerusalem be the property of the remnant, but there be a group of Ephiamites who bestow crowns?  What must these Ephriamites possess to be able to accomplish this task?  How can they possess it and not be lifted up in pride above all other people of the whole earth?  How can such power be put upon some group and they remain willing to ever bend the knee and confess before Him whose right it is to rule? 
How can the Gentiles both reject the fullness of the Gospel, yet there be some who are of Ephriam who are able to bestow crowns? 
What an interesting picture begins to emerge. Gentile rejection, but  a tiny group of Ephriamite servants whose lives are lived so as to bestow blessings upon others. 
The main body in the New Jerusalem coming from the remnant, who are to build the City of the New Jerusalem, yet within that City a functioning group of Ephriamites who will crown others with glory. All this preparatory to the Lord’s return to a City set upon a hill which cannot be hid. To a location in the tops of the everlasting mountains, where all will gather from every nation. 
Well, let’s keep going to see how much we can figure out from the scriptures to correct our foolish traditions about these future roles and perhaps gain an even better idea of locations.