The Son of David

David was a man “after the Lord’s own heart.” (1 Sam 13:14; Acts 13:22.) But David “hath fallen from his exaltation[.]” (D&C 132:39.)

If A=B then B=A. Therefore it can be likewise said that Christ was a man “after David’s own heart.”

Was the Lord considering David’s situation when He refused to use power given Him to satisfy His hunger? (Matt. 4:3-4.) Was David on the Lord’s mind when He instructed those He healed to “tell no man?” (Matt. 8:3-4; Mark 7:32-36; Luke 8:54-56.) Did the Lord know admiration and praise had been toxic to David and would likewise be toxic to Him?

Was the Lord thinking of David when He refused “all the kingdoms of the world, and the glory of them?” (Matt. 4:8-10.) Was David on the Lord’s mind when He declared His “kingdom was not of this world?” (John 18:36.) Did He remember David when He explained His example of servitude after kneeling and washing His followers’ feet? (John 13:4-16.)

Christ knew and stated He was “greatest of all.” (D&C 19:18.) He has explained He is “more intelligent than they all.” (Abr. 3:19.) Yet He came without crown, wealth, or earthly power. He was “meek and lowly of heart.” (Matt. 11:29.)

Did Christ know if He were made great by men He, like David, could be drawn away into the same sad end? He was tempted, as all men are. But He prevailed because He “gave no heed unto them.” (D&C 20:22.)

Did Christ remember David when He rebuked a man who praised Him and called Him “good.” He retorted, “Why callest thou me good? There is none good but one, that is, God.” (Matt. 19:16-17.)

If our Lord refused honor, acted as if a servant, and rejected praise from others, shouldn’t we also? How can anyone “aspire to the honors of men” or hold any “vain ambition” or seek to exercise “control or dominion or compulsion upon” others or claim to have “power or influence… by virtue of their priesthood”? (D&C 121:37-41.)

Christ behaved wisely and meekly. If He is the prototype of the saved man, who among us can be great without kneeling, serving, persuading, enduring with long-suffering, and relying on gentleness to bring others to come to Christ? Who would want to place themselves above their fellow-man, when the Lord knelt to wash men’s feet?

We should weep over our plight, and deal in kindness toward each other in our lost and fallen state. I hardly have the strength to speak when I consider what confronts us in this dark place. I think of David and the Son of David and fear for my own weaknesses, foolishness and pride.

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